Elon Musk Principles

No comments

Elon Reeve Musk FRS is a business magnate, investor and engineer. He is the founder, CEO, and lead designer of SpaceX; co-founder, CEO, and product architect of Tesla, Inc.; co-founder and CEO of Neuralink; and co-founder of PayPal.

“When something is important enough, you do it even if the odds are not in your favor.”

“There have to be reasons that you get up in the morning and you want to live. Why do you want to live? What’s the point? What inspires you? What do you love about the future? If the future does not include being out there among the stars and being a multi-planet species, I find that incredibly depressing.”

“When Henry Ford made cheap, reliable cars, people said, ‘Nah, what’s wrong with a horse?’ That was a huge bet he made, and it worked.”

“Persistence is very important. You should not give up unless you are forced to give up.”

“It’s OK to have your eggs in one basket as long as you control what happens to that basket.”

“If you go back a few hundred years, what we take for granted today would seem like magic-being able to talk to people over long distances, to transmit images, flying, accessing vast amounts of data like an oracle. These are all things that would have been considered magic a few hundred years ago.”

“The first step is to establish that something is possible; then probability will occur.”

“I think it is possible for ordinary people to choose to be extraordinary.”

“I could either watch it happen or be a part of it.”

“Some people don’t like change, but you need to embrace change if the alternative is disaster.”

“Failure is an option here. If things are not failing, you are not innovating enough.”

“The path to the CEO’s office should not be through the CFO’s office, and it should not be through the marketing department. It needs to be through engineering and design.”

“I think it’s very important to have a feedback loop, where you’re constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better.”

“There’s a tremendous bias against taking risks. Everyone is trying to optimize their ass-covering.”

“Brand is just a perception, and perception will match reality over time. Sometimes it will be ahead, other times it will be behind. But brand is simply a collective impression some have about a product.”

“I say something, and then it usually happens. Maybe not on schedule, but it usually happens.”

“I don’t spend my time pontificating about high-concept things; I spend my time solving engineering and manufacturing problems.”

“My biggest mistake is probably weighing too much on someone’s talent and not someone’s personality. I think it matters whether someone has a good heart.”

“I don’t create companies for the sake of creating companies, but to get things done.”

“I don’t believe in process. In fact, when I interview a potential employee and he or she says that ‘it’s all about the process,’ I see that as a bad sign. The problem is that at a lot of big companies, process becomes a substitute for thinking. You’re encouraged to behave like a little gear in a complex machine. Frankly, it allows you to keep people who aren’t that smart, who aren’t that creative.”

“There are really two things that have to occur in order for a new technology to be affordable to the mass market. One is you need economies of scale. The other is you need to iterate on the design. You need to go through a few versions.”

“I’m interested in things that change the world or that affect the future and wondrous, new technology where you see it, and you’re like, ‘Wow, how did that even happen? How is that possible?'”

“Really pay attention to negative feedback and solicit it, particularly from friends. … Hardly anyone does that, and it’s incredibly helpful.”

“If you get up in the morning and think the future is going to be better, it is a bright day. Otherwise, it’s not.”

“If you’re trying to create a company, it’s like baking a cake. You have to have all the ingredients in the right proportion.”

“As much as possible, avoid hiring MBAs. MBA programs don’t teach people how to create companies.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s